Grammar

What is grammar?

Language consists of words – spoken or written – which we use to communicate with other people. Grammar is the structure of that language: the way it’s used, and the conventions that help us understand what is meant from the context. ¬†We learn grammar as toddlers when we learn to speak, so if you speak correctly it’s likely that your children will too, without ever having been taught formally. Continue reading “Grammar”

Quantifiers

much, many, a little, a few

much or many

much: uncountable nouns (milk, marmalade, money, time etc.)
many: countable nouns (bottles of milk, jars of marmalade, dollars, minutes etc.)

Examples:
How much money have you got?
How many dollars have you got?

a little or a few

a little: non countable nouns (milk, marmalade, money, time etc.)
a few: countable nouns (bottles of milk, jars of marmalade, dollars, minutes etc.)

Examples:
He has a little money left.
He has a few dollars left.

some, any

some: affirmative statements, offers, requests and in questions when you expect the answer “yes”

any: negative statements, questions

Have you got any bananas? No, we haven’t got any. But we’ve got some oranges.

something, anything and other compounds with some/any

Compounds with some and any

The compounds with some and any are used like the single words some/any.

Compounds Examples
something
anything
There is something wrong with our car.
someone
anyone*
There is someone at the door.
somebody
anybody*
I would like to be somebody.
someday Someday he’ll be rich.
sometime
anytime
We saw her sometime last month.
sometimes I sometimes take the bus to school.
someplace
anyplace
somewhere
anywhere
Can’t you sing somewhere else?
somehow
anyhow
someway
anyway
She looked ill, somehow.
anymore I can’t help you anymore.

* There is no much difference between someone/anyone and somebody/anybody.

Examples:
There’s someone at the door.
I’d like to be somebody.